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To be or not to be found

Written by Michael Brooks - RSS Feed / Original link on Apr. 6, 2021

A lot of people choose to be found. This can be on social networks, their own website or networking in groups. So many people try so hard to be found and noticed. People rush to the next social networking website hoping it’s the “next big thing” and they can work it and gain a big following.

Personally, I’m trying to find my network of people using Twitter. I’m also trying to get my blog up in the search ranks so my posts and website can get noticed by more people. I’ve had this strange pull by audio social networks such as Clubhouse and Twitter Spaces. That’s where I feel I’ve finally found my people.

What if you don’t want to be found?

Many people never speak about not wanting to be found. Because you’ll never hear from the people that don’t want to be found. Which is obvious when you think about it. They use social networks and keep it private. You’ll only be able to connect with them if you have a genuine in-person connection.

They won’t be found by social networks because they want to remain hidden. In order to follow them, you’ll send them a request, and they’ll approve/deny that request.

For them, privacy is very important. Most of the time, they haven’t got anything to hide. They just want to stay private and keep their personal life personal. Many of us parade around and make so much of our personal’s lives public. Most of us are picky or more particular on what we share while others will share everything. From what they had for breakfast to their sleeping patterns.

The most important thing about being or not being found

The most important thing is that all of these are okay. We should do what we feel is comfortable. While also not being negative about what other’s share. It’s a completely personal preference, and that’s okay.

The post To be or not to be found appeared first on Michael Brooks.

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