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Moving my email newsletter from Substack to Revue

Written by Michael Brooks - RSS Feed / Original link on Feb. 13, 2021

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Recently, Twitter purchased Revue, and I noticed a new link on the side menu.

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My curiosity got the better of me, and I decided to click the link to see what it is.

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Okay Twitter and Revue, you’ve piqued my interest. I decided to sign up and have a little play around with it. I signed in with my Twitter account, and it took me to the create page where I could make my first newsletter episode. Because it’s connected to my Twitter account, I could see on the right-hand side my most recent tweets. I could click and drag them onto my newsletter, and it looks lovely.

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I decided to click on Tweets which shared my most recent blog posts, plus a cheeky affiliate tweet to Rave coffee (very tasty by the way). Once I was happy with it, I tried to schedule the email. However, due to having 0 subscribers, it wouldn’t let me send. It did helpfully ask if I wanted to add my email so I could schedule. I did this purely to test because I wanted to see how it works and looks.

Overall, I’ve been happy with the experience, and feel it’s better than Substack.

Why do I think it’s better than Substack?

I like the ability to click and drag tweets over. It also integrates into other apps such as Pocket, RSS feeds and more. These integrations make it super simple to find articles and information you find interesting and want to share with your readers. I do love Substack and what they’re offering to writers. However, I feel like they could have added more integrations as Revue have.

Because I’ve become more drawn to Revue and their offering, I decided to export my subscribers and import them to my new Revue newsletter. It was easy enough, and I even managed to use my iPad Pro to export my data to zip, unzip the data and then import my subscribers as a CSV file. The wonderful thing about Substack is that you can download ALL your data, including your newsletters and images used.

Both platforms are fantastic, and Substack as a company are amazing. You can download everything so quickly and move over to another company shows that they’re trustworthy. I just really like Revue and Twitter, and how they’ve made it easy to create a newsletter. I’m not sure how transparent Revue will be with their data and allowing you to move to another platform, but right now, I’m not too concerned. If that’s something, you’re worried about then definitely take a look at their terms.

If you create content, your number one focus should be a newsletter

I’ve learned that if you have content and readers, then your number one focus should be on building a newsletter. Why? Because you can 100% own your readers, and you won’t be fighting algorithms. Platforms such as Google, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook all have algorithms and can decide what content is pushed to eyes, and what isn’t. It can be a real slog and a real struggle for a lot of people. As well as other people’s tweets. It’s a constant battle for attention.

However, if you have a newsletter and subscribers, then the only thing you’ll be fighting is in the user’s email inbox and their attention. Email open rates are far higher and more consistent than any post on social media or search on Google.

Conclusion

I’m babbling, but I hope you get the picture of what I’m trying to say here. Own your content, own your readers, and you’ll be onto a winner compared to traditional creators/writers.

The post Moving my email newsletter from Substack to Revue appeared first on Michael Brooks.

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