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Fear of Decoupling

Objects talk to each other via their methods. In mainstream programming languages, like Java or C#, an object may have a unique set of methods together with some methods it is forced to have because it implements certain types, also known as interfaces . My experience of speaking with many programmers tells me that …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday September 18, 2018


Code Must Be Clean. And Clear.

There is a famous book by Robert Martin called Clean Code . The title is an obvious call to all of us: the code must be clean . Clean, like a kitchen, I suppose—there are no dirty dishes, no garbage on the floor, no smelly towels. Dirt to be cleaned in a code base, according to Martin, includes large methods, …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Wednesday September 12, 2018


Monolithic Repos Are Evil

We all keep our code in Git version control repositories. The question is whether we should create a new repository for each new module or try to keep as much as possible in a single so called “monolithic” repo. Market leaders, like Facebook and Google , advocate the second approach. I believe they are wrong. …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Wednesday September 5, 2018


Soft Skills Demystified

There are tech skills and there are soft skills. Every programmer knows that. Tech skills are about algorithms, operators, classes, objects, and everything else they teach us in tech schools. Soft skills are about something else. What exactly? Difficult to say. Let’s try to clear the air. Glengarry Glen Ross …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Wednesday August 29, 2018


Builders and Manipulators

Here is a simple principle for naming methods in OOP, which I’m trying to follow in my code: it’s a verb if it manipulates , it’s a noun if it builds . That’s it. Nothing in between. Methods like saveFile() or getTitle() don’t fit and must be renamed and refactored. Moreover, methods that “manipulate” must …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Wednesday August 22, 2018


70/70

A few days ago, a friend of mine asked me to join him in a new startup. He said that he needed a partner, to help him partially finance the project, promote it, bring in new ideas, and push the business forward. I liked the business idea and wanted to participate. I started to ask questions about our future partnershi…

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday August 14, 2018


What’s Wrong With Global Variables?

Only lazy people haven't written already about how global variables are evil. It started in 1973 when W. Wulf et al. claimed that "the non-local variable is a major contributing factor in programs which are difficult to understand." Since then, many other reasons where suggested to convince programmers to stop …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday July 3, 2018


Are You an Architect?

Over twenty five years ago, in 1992, at an OOPSLA workshop in Vancouver, Kent Beck, in answer to the question "What is an architect?" said, according to Philippe Kruchten , that it is "a new pompous title that programmers demand to have on their business cards to justify their sumptuous emoluments." Not much has …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday June 26, 2018


Simplified GitHub Login for a Ruby Web App

You know what OAuth login is, right? It's when your users click "login" and get redirected to Facebook, Twitter, Google, or some other website which then identifies them. Then they go back to your website and you know who they are. It's very convenient for them. It's convenient for you too, since you don't need to …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday June 19, 2018


Object Validation: to Defer or Not?

I said earlier that constructors must be code-free and do nothing aside from attribute initialization. Since then, the most frequently asked question is: What about validation of arguments? If they are "broken," what is the point of creating an object in an "invalid" state? Such an object will fail later, at an …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday May 29, 2018


One More Recipe Against NULL

You know what NULL is, right? It's evil . In OOP, your method can return NULL, it can accept NULL as an argument, your object can encapsulate it as an attribute, or you can assign it to a variable. All four scenarios are bad for the maintainability of your code—there are no doubts about that. The question is what to …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday May 22, 2018


The Right Way to Report a Bug

You know, at Zerocracy , either you are a programmer or a tester, and we pay for each bug you find and report. Well, not quite. We pay for each bug report a project architect considers good enough to pay for. The architect's decision is totally subjective and non-disputable, according to §29 of the Policy . Some …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 24, 2018


The Right Way to Report a Bug

You know, at Zerocracy , either you are a programmer or a tester, and we pay for each bug you find and report. Well, not quite. We pay for each bug report a project architect considers good enough to pay for. The architect's decision is totally subjective and non-disputable, according to §29 of the Policy . Some …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 24, 2018


How to Be Lazy and Stay Calm

What frustrates me most in my profession of software development is the regular necessity to understand large problem scopes before fixing small bugs, especially if the code is legacy and not mine. Actually, it's even more frustrating when the code is mine. The "deep thinking," as they call it , which is always …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 17, 2018


How to Be Lazy and Stay Calm

What frustrates me most in my profession of software development is the regular necessity to understand large problem scopes before fixing small bugs, especially if the code is legacy and not mine. Actually, it's even more frustrating when the code is mine. The "deep thinking," as they call it , which is always …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 17, 2018


Nine Steps of Learning by Refactoring

I was asked on Twitter recently how is it possible to refactor if one doesn't understand how the code works. I replied that it is "learning by refactoring." Then I tried to Google it and found nothing . I was surprised. To me refactoring seems to be the most effective and obvious way to study the source code. …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 10, 2018


Nine Steps of Learning by Refactoring

I was asked on Twitter recently how is it possible to refactor if one doesn't understand how the code works. I replied that it is "learning by refactoring." Then I tried to Google it and found nothing . I was surprised. To me refactoring seems to be the most effective and obvious way to study the source code. …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 10, 2018


Fully Transparent Donations via Zerocracy

Open source is free, as in beer: you write code, nobody pays you. Of course, there are many ways to monetize your efforts, but there will be no direct cash payments from your users, usually. There are ways to collect money, which include an obvious "tip jar" button on your GitHub project page. The chances anyone …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 3, 2018