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How to Be Lazy and Stay Calm

What frustrates me most in my profession of software development is the regular necessity to understand large problem scopes before fixing small bugs, especially if the code is legacy and not mine. Actually, it's even more frustrating when the code is mine. The "deep thinking," as they call it , which is always …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 17, 2018


Nine Steps of Learning by Refactoring

I was asked on Twitter recently how is it possible to refactor if one doesn't understand how the code works. I replied that it is "learning by refactoring." Then I tried to Google it and found nothing . I was surprised. To me refactoring seems to be the most effective and obvious way to study the source code. …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 10, 2018


Fully Transparent Donations via Zerocracy

Open source is free, as in beer: you write code, nobody pays you. Of course, there are many ways to monetize your efforts, but there will be no direct cash payments from your users, usually. There are ways to collect money, which include an obvious "tip jar" button on your GitHub project page. The chances anyone …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday April 3, 2018


How I Test My Java Classes for Thread-Safety

I touched on this problem in one of my recent webinars , now it's time to explain it in writing. Thread-safety is an important quality of classes in languages/platforms like Java, where we frequently share objects between threads. The issues caused by lack of thread-safety are very difficult to debug, since they are …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday March 27, 2018


Don’t Aim for Quality, Aim for Speed

I decided to write this blog post after reviewing this pull request . What happened there? The author of the PR wasn't able to figure out the "right" way to implement it, and the code reviewer was waiting and waiting. Eventually, the reviewer came to me, since I was an architect, and complained that it was taking …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday March 6, 2018


Don’t Parse, Use Parsing Objects

The traditional way of integrating object-oriented back-end with an external system is through data transfer objects , which are serialized into JSON before going out and deserialized when coming back. This way is as much popular as it is wrong. The serialization part should be replaced by printers , which I …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday February 27, 2018


Microvesting

Most startups don't have enough cash to pay programmers as much as they deserve, unfortunately (or maybe not). Instead of cash, startups give their early employees shares of stock , which they will be able to either 1) sell in a few years and become millionaires billionaires, or 2) throw away and remain nobodies. …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday February 13, 2018


More Bugs, Please

A bug is something we find in a software product that "doesn't look right" (this is my personal definition). A bug can be hidden or visible; it can be "already fixed" or "still present"; it can be critical or cosmetic; it can be urgent or of a low priority. What is important is that the more bugs we are able to …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday February 6, 2018


Are You a Coder or a Developer?

Software development and coding are two different things. Usually, the former includes the latter, but not always. Coding produces lines of code, while software development creates products. Unfortunately, the majority of programmers joining Zerocracy now are coders . Even though they claim to be developers, in …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday January 23, 2018


The Educational Aspect of Static Analysis

Very often new programmers who join our projects ask us whether we have auto-formatting instruments to make Java code look exactly the way Qulice expects. (Qulice is the static analyzer we use.) I always reply that having such an automated code polisher would only be harmful and wouldn't help the project and its …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday January 16, 2018


Five Stages of Microbudgeting

Microtasking, which I explained in an earlier post, works only when each task has a very specific reward for success and a punishment for failure. I believe that the best reward and punishment instrument is money. The budget is fixed, the programmer gets it only when the task is completed (reward), no matter how …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday January 9, 2018


Operator new() is Toxic

To instantiate objects, in most object-oriented languages, including Java, Ruby, and C++, we use operator new() . Well, unless we use static factory methods, which we don't use because they are evil . Even though it looks so easy to make a new object any time we need it, I would recommend to be more careful with …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday January 2, 2018


The Formula for Software Quality

How do you define the quality of a software product? There is definitely an intrinsic emotional component to it, which means satisfaction for the user, willingness to pay, appreciation, positive attitude, and all that. However, if we put emotions aside, how can we really measure it? The IEEE says that quality is the …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday December 26, 2017


SRP is a Hoax

The Single Responsibility Principle , according to Robert Martin 's Clean Code , means that "a class should have only one reason to change." Let's try to decrypt this rather vague statement and see how it helps us design better object-oriented software. If it does. The Thomas Crown Affair (1999) by John …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday December 19, 2017


Alan Kay Was Wrong About Him Being Wrong

From time to time someone asks me what I think about what Alan Kay , the father of OOP, the designer of Smalltalk , the first object-oriented language, said in 1998 about OOP. He literally said that the very term "object" was misleading and a more appropriate one would be "messaging." Here is what I think. …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday December 12, 2017


DAO is Yet Another OOP Shame

Someone asked me what I think about DAO and I realized that, even though I wrote about ORM , DTO , and getters , I haven't had a chance yet to mention DAO. Here is my take on it: it's as much of a shame as its friends—ORM, DTO, and getters. In a nutshell, a Data Access Object is an object that "provides an …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday December 5, 2017


How Micro Is Your Tasking?

"What are you doing now?"—when you hear this question from your boss, be aware: you're dealing with a micromanager . Keeping us busy is the key objective of these creatures and this is what makes them so annoying. To the contrary, effective managers make sure we are productive , meaning that our results satisfy th…

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday November 28, 2017


Trust. Pay. Lose.

"Listen up, dude," a friend of mine said when he called yesterday, "I trusted them for over a year—we've been partners. They've been programming it all and I was busy doing business development. Now they've quit and I'm left with nothing! What am I supposed to do with all these JavaScript files? How do I even know …

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Written by Yegor Bugayenko - - Aggregated on Tuesday November 21, 2017