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Myth #15: Users make optimal choices

Written by UX Myths - Published on UX Myths
Aggregated on Sunday June 20, 2010 - Permalink

In an ideal world, users would scan through your entire page to find the very piece of information they’re looking for, but research shows this is not the case. Usability tests prove that people tend to choose the first somewhat reasonable choice that catches their eyes. That is, once they come across a link whose label refers even a little to what they’ve come for, they’ll click it. This is …

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Myth #16: Search will solve a website's navigation problems

Written by UX Myths - Published on UX Myths
Aggregated on Sunday June 20, 2010 - Permalink

On a website, people usually scan for trigger words first and only use the search function when they’re unable to find a good enough navigational link. This holds true for most websites, though people habitually search by default for books, DVDs and CDs, computer games; that is, products whose title or author they know. People are better at recognizing things than recalling them from memory. …

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Myth #18: Flash used to be evil

Written by UX Myths - Published on UX Myths
Aggregated on Sunday June 20, 2010 - Permalink

Note, this post was written more than 4 years ago. In the earlier years of the internet, many web designers preferred overusing Flash animations, ignoring users with slow internet connections or without Flash player. These early implementations often neglected basic usability principles, too, therefore the whole technology was criticized for being unusable and inaccessible. Flash technology …

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Myth #17: The homepage is your most important page

Written by UX Myths - Published on UX Myths
Aggregated on Sunday June 20, 2010 - Permalink

Usability experts, including Jakob Nielsen, have long argued that your homepage is the most valuable real estate of your website. As a result, lots of web designers and developers still spend most of their time on the design of the home page. This, in fact, is no longer the case, as users’ browsing and searching behavior has significantly changed over time. Website statistics convincingly …

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Myth #19: You don't need the content to design a website

Written by UX Myths - Published on UX Myths
Aggregated on Sunday June 20, 2010 - Permalink

Many designers create wireframes and comps with “ lorem ipsum ” filler text. Using dummy text often results in an aesthetically pleasing but unrealistic design. What’s worse, it creates the illusion that content is secondary. The fact is that users come for the content, not the design. Content is by far the most important element in user interface design. A webpage with a simple structure but …

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Myth #20: If it works for Amazon, it will work for you

Written by UX Myths - Published on UX Myths
Aggregated on Sunday June 20, 2010 - Permalink

Although Amazon has features that are both excellent and well-proven, they won’t necessarily work on any e-commerce website. Let’s take their customer reviews for example. Target.com bought Amazon’s customer review software. Jared Spool demonstrates that, despite using the same exact software and interface, Target.com doesn’t receive any reviews at all: in the first month after Harry Potter and …

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